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Accueil > Resources > Publications > How can organizations get the guidance necessary to introduce project (...)

How can organizations get the guidance necessary to introduce project management training and the proper training path ?

How can organizations get the guidance necessary to introduce project management training and the proper training path ?

Organizations have to include Project Management as a key lever in the organizational development program to improve profitability, cash generation and increase customer satisfaction. In many cases they need to develop a global training approach on some key specific training domains for the organization. Project Management is one of these topics. As other employees, project managers that plan their career advancement are more engaged, satisfied and ultimately more valuable to their organization.

Since 2005, PMGS is working with global organizations to deliver project management training programs to a large variety of resource worldwide. This document is intent to help its customers and partners to find the right training for the right people. PMGS has developed its own project management training curriculum for its course offering.

In addition to project management introduction training, many organizations are looking to complement the current training by offering targeted training plans for their project management population.

PMGS would welcome an opportunity to discuss project management training possibilities and PMGS qualification in order to help your organizations to achieve this goal. This article has been composed with intent to present :

  • The PMGS standard Project Management training paths which is based on the PMI® standard ;
  • The PMI® standard in competency development and the tool Pathpro® ;
  • How PMGS can help your organization to determine their own targeted project management training paths.

The PMGS project management training paths
Targeted training paths help organizations address the development needs of their employees in a sequential way that focuses training on the most needed areas.

This PMGS project management training paths have been elaborated using the PMGS experience in targeted training development for its customers and using as a foundation, the PMI® standard and tools in competency and career framework.

The curriculum table is attacehd to this document

Project Population Profile
Based on the PMI® standard and the career framework, PMGS has distinguished six main profiles in the Project Management Population :

  • Stakeholders : Person involve in the project or whose interests by execution or completion of the project. The following are some example of stakeholders : Team members, functional manager, sponsors, etc.
  • Junior Project Manager : Under direct supervision of a more senior Project Manager, a Portfolio Manager, or a Program Manager, manages a small project or phase(s) of a larger project.
  • Project Manager : Under general supervision of either a Portfolio Manager or a Program Manager, leads and directs multiple projects or one larger project.
  • Senior Project Manager : Under general direction of either a Portfolio Manager or in some cases a Program Manager, leads and directs high-priority projects, which often require considerable resources and high levels of functional integration.
  • Program Manager : Responsible for the coordinated management of multiple related projects, and in many (most) cases, ongoing operations which are directed toward a common objective.
  • Management : People involve in the management of projects at the organizational level such as senior managers, managers of PM’s, executives, Project Management Office (PMO) team members, portfolio manager.

More details on the profile definition can be found in the PathPro® presentation attached.

Training level description
For each audience described above, PMGS have structured the training offering to encourage skill development through progressive levels of proficiency within the participants’ required skill set. The fours training level are :

  • Introduction : Our introduction courses are perfect for individuals who need a foundation in project management or in program management - Depending on your profile ; these courses will provide an excellent base upon which to build.
  • Reference : Our reference courses are perfect for individuals who are looking to consolidate and learn in depth what they have already learned. For each knowledge area, participants will advance the skills and knowledge.
  • Certifications : Our certification courses give participant the knowledge they need to pass the PMI certification exams. These courses will also teach you how to tackle exam questions.
  • Master : Our master courses give participant the skills and knowledge expected at this level. From advanced project management to project management maturity this courses cover all dimensions of project management.

Training solutions
Depending of the audience, the topic or the level of proficiency of the participants, the training solutions should vary to ensure the right format is used to maximise the learning.

Moreover, taking time out for training can be a challenge. Short duration workshops and conferences are designed to focus on specific aspects of project management with minimal time disruption. The training solutions proposed by PMGS are :

  • Conference : The conference aims at informing the participants on current and key Project Management topics. This activity lasts one day.
  • Training : PMGS trainings are compliant with the PMI standards and last from two to three days. This approach is based on a combination of theory and practise, through the study of two examples which may adapted to your context.
  • Workshop : The workshop aims at sharing experiences through simulation exercises and case-studies. This activity lasts one day and is based on key Project Management concepts.
  • Webinar : The Online solutions will help the participants to continue develop their professional skills with the current constraints faced by project professionals. These solutions could be live virtual classroom and webinars or self-paced online learning through webcasts and e-learning.

The PMI® Standard

The Project Management Career Framework

Since 1997, the Project Management Institute (PMI®) has sponsored initiatives to produce a framework for the professional development of project managers. The objective is to provide both individuals and organizations with guidance on how to manage the professional development of the project manager.

The PMI®’s first standard to address the theme of “Improving the Performance of Project Personnel is The Project Management Career Development Framework (PMCD). The PMCD Framework aligns with the PMBOK® Guide and the Project Management Professional (PMP®) Role Delineation Study and current literature. This standard has been launched in 2002.

The targeted audience for this standard includes project managers, those aspiring to be project managers, the organizations that employ both of them, and any associated industry professional groups involved in managing projects.

The PMCD Framework defines the key dimensions of project manager competence and the competencies that are most likely to impact project manager performance as they lead most projects most of the time.

Career Framework and PathPro®

Base on the PMCD standard, PMI® has created a career framework that provides organizations a list of skills commonly found in successful project professionals.

PMI®’s career framework can be accessed using PathPro®, a website designed to help navigate the career framework knowledge base, review the full list of skills and competencies.

PMI®’s Career Framework is based on extensive research of project managers and the skills that lead to success. PMI® conducted research with more than 5000 project, program and portfolio managers and used results from this research as the basis for developing the skills and project profiles used in the job descriptions.

Career Framework provides organizations with the guidance necessary to introduce advanced-level project positions including program and portfolio managers.

The PMI® Career Framework is based on the following key components :

  • Job descriptions of project positions including program and portfolio managers
  • Project, program and portfolio management skills mapped to job descriptions using a robust research process conducted with over 6000 practitioners worldwide.
  • Levels of proficiency for each skill identified through aggressive research conducted with approximately 2000 practitioners worldwide.
  • Project profiles delineate the size and type of project managed by each project professional within a given role. To identify the key components of a project profile approximately 2000 practitioners were polled worldwide.

Job descriptions :

Portfolio Manager :

  • Definition : Responsible for the management of the entire collection of projects and/or programs undertaken by an organization or division in a manner that ensures their alignment with the organization’s strategic objectives.
  • Duties : Works with constituent Project Managers (who are responsible to the Program Manager for the execution of their project and its impact on the program) to monitor cost, schedule, and technical performance of component projects and operations, while working to ensure the ultimate success of the program. Generally responsible for determining and coordinating the sharing of resources among their constituent projects to the overall benefit of the program. Usually responsible for stakeholder management particularly stakeholders external to the organization.
  • Management Experience : 15 to 20 years

Program Manager

  • Definition : Responsible for the coordinated management of multiple related projects, and in many cases, ongoing operations which are directed toward a common objective.
  • Duties : Works with constituent Project Managers (who are responsible to the Program Manager for the execution of their project and its impact on the program) to monitor cost, schedule, and technical performance of component projects and operations, while working to ensure the ultimate success of the program. Generally responsible for determining and coordinating the sharing of resources among their constituent projects to the overall benefit of the program. Usually responsible for stakeholder management particularly stakeholders external to the organization.
  • Management Experience : 11 to 15 years

Project Manager I

  • Definition : Under direct supervision of a more senior Project Manager, a Portfolio Manager, or a Program Manager, manages a small project or phase(s) of a larger project.
  • Duties : Responsibility for all aspects of the project over the entire life (initiate, plan, execute, control, close). Must be familiar with system scope and project objectives, as well as the role and function of each team member, to effectively coordinate the activities of the team.
  • Management Experience : 0 to 3 years

Project Manager II

  • Definition : Under general supervision of either a Portfolio Manager or a Program Manager, leads and directs multiple projects or one larger project.
  • Duties : In addition to duties of Project Manager I, responsible for assembling project team, assigning individual responsibilities, identifying appropriate resources needed, and developing schedule to ensure timely completion of project. May communicate with a Senior Project Manager, Functional Area Manager, or Program Manager regarding status of specific projects.
  • Management Experience : 3 to 5 years

Project Manager III

  • Definition : Under general direction of either a Portfolio Manager or in some cases a Program Manager, leads and directs high-priority projects, which often require considerable resources and high levels of functional integration.
  • Duties : In addition to duties of a Project Manager II, takes projects from original concept through final implementation. Interfaces with all areas affected by the project including end users, distributors, and vendors. Ensures adherence to quality standards and review project deliverables. May communicate with a company executive regarding the status of specific projects.
  • Management Experience : 6 to 10 years

Skills and competencies
To support the job functions defined above, PMI has identified a list of skills commonly found in successful project professionals. This skill’s list is divided in 3 competencies’ group :

  • Interpersonal : Tasks and skills in listening, oral and written communication, among others, are categorized into the interpersonal competency.
  • Leadership : Tasks and skills in leading, not managing, project, program, or portfolio teams are categorized into the leadership competency.
  • Professional : Tasks and skills in project management, program management, or portfolio management processes are categorized into the professional competency.

Level of proficiency
The level of proficiency indicates the level to which a skill must be applied for a particular job description. Definitions of these levels are

  • Level 0 : Skill is not applicable for this job description.
  • Level 1 : Knowledge of this skill is required for this job description. The ability to apply the skill is not required.
  • Level 2 : The ability to apply, with supervision, this skill is required for this job description.
  • Level 3 : The ability to apply, independently, this skill is required for this job description.
  • Level 4 : Ability to apply, at a mastery level, this skill is required for this job description.

Project Profile
In the Career Framework, PMI® has identified 5 categories of project profile. The definition of these profiles will help to evaluate the type of project aligned with the job description or the project professional experience. The project profiles are the following :

  • Large Project
  • Portfolio
  • Program
  • Project
  • Work Package

How PMGS can help ?
Through a collaborative approach with its clients, PMGS has successfully defined and implemented targeted training plans in Project Management. Usually, this activity is associated with the definition of Project Management Career Paths. PMGS utilises a “project” approach which is made up of the following high-level activities :

1. Identify a small steering committee representative of the project population. PMGS could facilitate meetings and provide its project management expertise and experience with its customer.

2. Clarification of the Project roles definition

  • Evaluate existing Project Management roles in context of their roles and responsibilities.
  • Analyze the project environment to evaluate the project profile and determine the adequacy with the project roles. PMGS could help with interviews to determine the project profile.
  • Benchmark with other companies and/or standards. PMGS recommends the application of an internationally recognized standard such as the PMI® PATHPRO® Standard. PMGS could provide assistance with the use of the standard.
  • Based on these evaluations, revise project role definition which include roles and responsibilities, project profiles and skills and competencies required. PMGS could assist in the definition.

3. Targeted Project Management training plans

  • Conduct an in-depth review of the training needs. Competency assessments may be required to facilitate the definition of the training needs. The outcome has to be aligned with the known improvement leads in the project area. PMGS could facilitate workshops and provide competency assessment tools.
  • Define development paths to support the Project roles and how to “bridge” the different roles. PMGS could provide assistance in the elaboration of the targeted training plans.
  • Build training programs aligned with the organizational needs and to ensure that training objectives will yield concrete results after training delivery. At this stage, needs for customization should be evaluated. PMGS validate the alignment with the company strategy and provide customization figures for evaluation.
  • Produce a training calendar that meets the needs of the various audiences. PMGS could assist in defining the calendar and the proper training solutions. The output will integrate a mix of PMGS public and customer onsite sessions.
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Training Curriculum and Project Profile

ABOUT PMGS
Since 1994, unparalleled, proven expertise in project management training and consulting has made PMGS a natural partner for organizations from all industries on every continent that require new strategies and methods in order to boost project performance. PMGS’s action-oriented approach is based upon customized and integrated solutions with the objective to increase the competency level of resources and the maturity level of the organization. PMGS experienced consultant network offer dual expertise in project management training and consulting.

The international activity of PMGS in 2010 represents hundreds of deliveries in more than 25 countries and 8 different languages. PMGS’s offices are located in Montreal and Paris. PMGS designs and performs integrated and customized solutions that contribute to develop skills and maturity in Project Management. These solutions are based on the project Management Institute (PMI®) standards.

Stephanie Constantin
PMGS
(514) 904-1428 ext.230
infoamerica@pmgsgroup.com